Book Review: The Out of Sync Child

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Book Review- Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping With Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years

               Kranowitz, C.S. (2016). Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up: Coping With Sensory Processing Disorder in the Adolescent and Young Adult Years. New York, NY. The Penguin Group.

 

 

 

In Carol Kranowitz first book The Out-of-Sync Child, many challenges and strategies of living with sensory processing disorder (SPD) are brought to light. It was an enlightening read that I would recommend to professionals, parents, and friends that interact with individuals of all ages, stages, and diagnosis involving SPD. Based on the overall knowledge I gained from that book, I was excited to read Kranowitz’s sequel The Out-of-Sync Child Grows Up. The material is very applicable to the age groups and backgrounds that I have been privileged to work with at The George Center thus far. After learning more about sensory processing, I was left with several specific questions. This book answered many of them!

 

Before jumping into details of the book, think with me first to back when you were or teenager or young adult. The hormone changes, the emotions, the desires or disappointments, the perspective you had on life, how you compare yourself to others, maybe even how you judged others around you, and so on. Teenage years can be an awkward time of maturing and an exciting time of development, but they can also be a painful stage if support systems are not present. We can all remember mentors, parents, siblings, teachers, and coaches that influenced and encouraged us. But, what if you were different physically? What if you couldn’t wear clothes that were in style because they irritated your skin or you couldn’t participate in extracurricular activities due physical challenges? What if people didn’t understand and support you? Not having certain opportunities in this stage of life can feel confusing, unfair, and often hurtful, as peers are not always accepting of anything or anyone deemed “different”.  This is something that individuals with SPD face, especially considering that SPD is often diagnosed alongside other diagnosis such as autism, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and attention deficit disorder.

 

Sensory obstacles come in all forms. There are sensory modulation disorders, sensory discrimination disorders, and sensory-based motor disorders (Kranowitz, 2016). No matter the form, everyday tasks like getting dressed, eating meals, and travel have unique challenges. Many normal daily activities may be painful, over stimulating, or physically challenging to individuals with SPD. Considering this, Kranowitz emphasizes the importance of family relationships amongst this population.

 

For the purposes of this review I would like to focus mainly on what Kranowitz shares about coping with relationships and gaining self-acceptance. Often individuals with diagnoses that cause them to perform differently than others also are perceived differently, which can have a large emotional effect. Through working with multiple populations that face SPD, especially motor movement differences and speech challenges, I know from experience not to assume anything based off of what is perceived  on the outside. There is always more going on with the body and mind of a person than what we perceive from the outside. This book exemplifies this reality through research review and testimonial compilation.  

 

Let’s talk about negativity. Many different emotions, for example shame and guilt, stem from negativity. For individuals with sensory differences, these feelings are a huge issue (Kranowitz, 2016, p. 44). This is important for teachers, peers, caregivers, and especially family of individuals with SPD to be aware of. Although SPD has no found cure, individuals and families can learn to make adaptations and live in a way that works for them. Instead of frustration when it takes longer for an individual with SPD to complete classwork, there should be encouragement. Kranowitz shares one adult male’s testimony with SPD, saying, “Stop listening to those that don’t understand you” (Kranowitz, 2016, p. 51). The individual went on to encourage people to research their symptoms, reframe their situation, and seek out effective therapeutic resources to help them overcome big challenges. This individual had friends and family that supported him throughout an occupational therapy journey. Over time he was able to report feeling hopeful instead of hopeless in a world of sensory obstacles.

 

As teenagers with SPD struggle emotionally, so can their close family members. It is not easy when a parent lacks understanding for the way their child reacts to certain situations or stimuli (Kranowitz, 2016, p. 155). The family dynamic can be negatively affected if therapeutic approaches and lifestyle adaptations are not utilized. An example shared was a teenager who grew up feeling distant from her parents and siblings because she was misunderstood. Her reactions to scratchy clothes and loud noises were treated as misbehaviors. When she had a meltdown and received additional attention from her parents, her siblings teased her and exhibited jealousy towards her. It wasn’t until later in life that she was diagnosed with mild autism and SPD. She was thankful to finally have an answer to why she felt so out of place (Kranowitz, 2016, p. 157).

 

This is where music therapy becomes a wonderful option, because it creates a therapeutic atmosphere that is client centered, effective, and generalizable in the home. Music also becomes a means of sensory integration and coping through the support of music interventions. In chapter 13 individuals share examples of their successes and thriving careers. After years of therapy, supportive families, informed teachers, and applied coping strategies, they were able to overcome challenges to accomplish their goals. Several of them mention music in their excerpts. There is a drummer and a singer, both advocates in the SPD community. They share about how music was their lifeline, as it restored order in their bodies when other activities were too much (Kranowitz, 2016).

 

One of many skills I have been able to work on during my time at The George Center has been counseling. Counseling techniques are important because many of the patients we serve not only want to improve and meet their therapeutic goals, but there is also an element of coping with a diagnosis that is a constant battle in many of their lives. Kranowitz elaborates on the emotional impact living with SPD can have on individuals sharing pieces of personal testimonies, as well as sharing therapeutic success stories from professionals. Applicable coping strategies for life skills and emotional trials are also shared in each chapter.  Some of these topics include daily activities, relationships, and transitioning into adulthood. The last section of the book focuses on specific treatment and shares multiple examples of therapies as well as lifestyle changes that have benefited individuals with SPD in the long run. Although music therapy is not explicitly referenced, the importance of music is mention multiple times.

 

I think it is important to note that this book has a strong occupational therapy focus, but encourages all options. After reading the many testimonies and complimentary terminology to music therapy, I was ready to research more. I would LOVE to find the music therapy based equivalent of this book. Music therapy fits in so well with this population, and I have seen first hand sensory success made in music therapy sessions. One beneficial technique mentioned throughout this book is deep pressure. In music therapy we utilize a similar technique, called rhythmic body mapping. Other techniques used are lyric analysis, sensory integration using music and instruments, movement to music, music performance, and therapeutic singing.


Overall I was pleased with the information this book had to offer and I enjoyed the way the author connected the medical research to real life examples. It was a truly eye opening read as some of the testimonials were sad, but very real. For anyone wanting to read more into how it feels to live with SPD or a diagnosis with similar challenges, this is definitely the book for you.