How Music Therapy Benefits the Classroom

One of the most important things I have to monitor as a music therapist is whether or not the skills developed in the music therapy setting are being generalized across all of my client's environments.  Just because my client now uses full sentence requests in music therapy doesn't mean that he is doing this at home and school as well.  When skills transfer, I get to see the secondary benefits of music therapy that go beyond the goal sheets.

"When skills transfer, I get to see the secondary benefits of music therapy that go beyond the goal sheets."

 

I'll use a few objectives as an example.  When a client increases his ability to communicate wants and needs, or decreases incidences of disruptive behaviors, the effects can reach beyond that client.  Decreased disruptive behavior in the classroom can improve the overall functionality of the class, allowing teachers and assistants to focus their efforts on the facilitation of learning.  Increased ability to communicate wants and needs allows the teacher to better monitor the progress of all students, and adjust their methods as needed.  This not only benefits my clients, but their classmates and even their teachers as well.

This is not limited to individual music therapy services either.  A music therapy group at a school can zero in on some of these objectives that will allow classrooms to run smoother.

Learn more about group music therapy services through The George Center!

Andrew Littlefield MM, MT-BC

The George Center , 12060 Etris Road, Roswell, GA, 30075